New Exhibits

The paintings of local missionary Annie Allen raise questions on how we interpret freedom. Born into a world of privilege, she was ‘free’ to travel widely and her paintings offer a rich insight into the lives of tribespeople in Uganda as well as the culture and wildlife.

However, Annie was equally constrained by her obligations as a missionary and the limitations of her gender; particularly as a member of the ‘polite’ class. Her experience contrasts with the relaxed way of life her paintings convey: the wide spaces and freedom from Western ideology.

Through Annie Allen’s gaze, we are reminded of a world of paradoxes: The ‘hunter’ and empire constantly underly the vivid colours and zest for life documented in her paintings.

This exhibition forms part of the continuing Women of West Wales (WOWW) project with support from Arwain Sir Benfro. Access to the exhibition is included with entry to the museum.

Permanent Collection

As both the mythical court of Pwyll, Prince of Dyfed, in the ancient tales of the Mabinogion and the bustling 19th Century  market town , Narberth has a long and fascinating history.

Its legend is told at Narberth Museum, through a diverse collection of artifacts, an archive of documents and social history, vibrant interpretation and interactive activities.

A scale model of the castle will help you visualise what once stood on the site of Narberth’s ruined castle and an interactive game illustrates the tactics used in medieval siege warfare.

A working scale model of the station is set up with trains running to an original timetable or walk the streets of turn-of-the-century Narberth and experience some of the shops that were around at the time.

One of the most popular areas of the museum for young families is our Mabinogion woodland glade. As well as explaining the story of the Mabinogion through interpretive panels it includes a storytelling chair where children can listen to welsh folk stories in English and Welsh. There are also puzzles and games for younger children to play with.

As well as our permanent collection, there is a programme of temporary or visiting exhibitions throughout the year.

Coming soon

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Partaking of the Tea

Freedom? The Paintings of Annie Allen

The paintings of local missionary Annie Allen raise questions on how we interpret freedom. Born into a world of privilege, she was ‘free’ to travel widely and her paintings offer a rich insight into the lives of tribespeople in Uganda as well as the culture and wildlife.

However, Annie was equally constrained by her obligations as a missionary and the limitations of her gender; particularly as a member of the ‘polite’ class. Her experience contrasts with the relaxed way of life her paintings convey: the wide spaces and freedom from Western ideology.

Through Annie Allen’s gaze, we are reminded of a world of paradoxes: The ‘hunter’ and empire constantly underly the vivid colours and zest for life documented in her paintings.

Access to the exhibition is included with museum admission.

Ten from Pembs by Efa Lois #WOWW